Dubai Flow Motion by Rob Whitworth

By: Rob Whitworth
Source: http://ift.tt/1Av73Wz

My first impression of Dubai was that of super-tall buildings jutting out of the desert sand. However, after 3 months of exploration, research and filming, my lasting impression is of the eternal wonder of the desert and the importance it holds for the Emirati people.

Dubai may be home to the world’s most outrageous skyline but Dubai’s desert dunes and historical creek are where you’ll find its soul.

A special thank you to Dubai Film for making this project possible and for providing the extraordinary access which enabled me to realise this story.

If you want to see more…

An extended version of the airport baggage scene, from plane arrival to luggage cart in 4K here:
http://ift.tt/1AeicYA

And also the creek scene in full, the original of this is 13500px (13.5K) across however in 4k here:
http://ift.tt/1Av73WC

Sound Design: Slava Pogorelsky
Email: kultenyeuk@walla.com
Facebook: http://ift.tt/1n06nen

Rob Whitworth
Website: http://ift.tt/RKDvcc
Facebook: http://ift.tt/13F6Pr8
Instagram: http://ift.tt/1HhicdZ

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U U G G H H by Hot Tea

By: Hot Tea
Source: http://ift.tt/1Iq73La

New York City is rapidly changing. The culture and lifestyles are changing with the surroundings and soon what used to be NYC will no longer be. The building on Bowery and Spring Where Jay Maisel and his family reside has been an iconic building representing what New York City used to be. He refused to move, sell and even clean the graffiti on the exterior of his building. It served almost as a time capsule into the old new york.

One night on my way into the SoHo part of NYC I walked by this building and noticed the shadows that resided inside the indents of the walls. Typically my eyes go straight to the graffiti, wheat pastes and stickers that cover the side of the building. I believe for the majority of us that is what we see. It was quite amazing to see past that and see something totally different, the architecture of the building.

After that moment, I stepped across the street to view the building in its entirety. I immediately saw a grid in which to work on and my brain quickly started designing typography. I left the area inspired and new that I had to act quick before the building became off limits. I booked my flight back to NYC the next week and began a week long process of constructing the letters and organizing the installation.

The end result was an installation that non-destructively interacted with the building. Nothing was damaged and was completely removable with simply a “tug”. With simply using the existing architecture and a bit of planning U U G G H H was created.

Thank you to Tony Depew, Michael Boczon, Clark Slater, Christine Reilly, Andrew Pomeroy, Alex Zagey, Nick Martin and the city of New York for being a consistent source of inspiration.